How do we ensure fair and equitable access to transport in the Mobility as a Service culture?
How do we ensure fair and equitable access to transport in the Mobility as a Service culture?

How do we ensure fair and equitable access to transport in the Mobility as a Service culture?

Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is about creating choice, bringing all modes (car, ride share, public and active transport) together, integrating them into people’s lives rather than forcing transport solutions upon them.

The benefits of an integrated MaaS system are many: people can understand the choices available to them, selecting from options designed to meet user needs, make transport decisions (and pay for them) more easily, all of which creates a better ability to move around.

This survey shows people want this integration and on-demand choice. But with so many differences regarding the way people want to move around and want their goods to move around, what challenges does that present for the future of urban mobility and MaaS? How can we tackle those challenges to create a mobility future that is people driven, and improves lives?

Creating this MaaS culture will be challenging. In growing cities, the only option to achieve reasonable mobility and journey time success is to improve integration, access to, and use of, mass transit. This is a challenge when – as our data reveals – a majority of respondents still rely on a car, rather than considering other options.

Woman walking on bus

We need to instil a behavioural change to enable people to be more open to other modes of transport through providing better, reliable choice.

Despite Australia’s history and love for the car, we are seeing pockets of change. People in new high-density residences near stations have a reduced need to own their own vehicle, instead opting for a range of on-demand and short-term options should they need to access a private vehicle. 

This is a new mindset, a new demographic and a new population type.

City versus regional

65% of regional respondents believe they will have moved to a city by 2035. On the other hand, just 4% of city respondents are considering a tree change by 2035, while 96% believe they will still be living and working in the city suburbs or CBD.

When it came to food choices, regional respondents were more likely to consider local produce in contrast to city-based counterparts who chose food based on mood, with little regard for the cost to the environment.

City responses highlight an overwhelming desire for convenience, whereas regional responses show stronger links to community and environment.

When it came to food choices, regional respondents were more likely to consider local produce in contrast to city-based counterparts who chose food based on mood, with little regard for the cost to the environment.

City vs regional infographic - convenience and equitable access to food

How will growing urban and declining regional populations impact the MaaS culture and fair and equitable access?

Solutions must reflect the needs of the people — one solution for one area, might not be right for the next.

Equitable access and choice

As cities mature, we are seeing more ways to get around and more convenience. On-demand transit gives us more choice — there is no need for a timetable, you can turn up and a service will be there or in some cases it will come to you. Add into the mix more micro-transport (e.g. e-scooters) and urban dwellers have more ability to get from their city apartment to transit hubs, transport becomes cheaper and more accessible, and the need for a car becomes less.

In regional areas where the needs are different, the MaaS picture will be different. As technology enables regional areas to become places where people live AND work, the distances needed to travel every day will reduce — this opens up opportunities for MaaS options suitable to shorter trips, such as on-demand transport and ride sharing. With more transport options available in regional areas, could we see this drive population growth?

In some suburbs and towns there are no alternatives to a car, or at best a reliance on an at capacity bus transit system. While other areas are spoilt for choice. Equitable access to transport and freight options maximises participation and inclusion in the community and leads to better liveability.

With more transport options available in regional areas, could we see this drive population growth?With more transport options available in regional areas, could we see this drive population growth?

Governments and the private sector have important roles to play in fostering equity in the provision of transport, ensuring geographic coverage and accessibility, as well as serving low-income and vulnerable populations. By working together to build a mobility future that is people driven, we have the opportunity to improve lives for all people.

Multi-modal offering and how this is communicated

The difference between what industry and the public want

The survey revealed some major disconnects between the general public and industry – relating to multi-modal offering. Overwhelmingly, industry was more inclined to consider multi-modes of transport in their daily choices.

Transport for NSW’s future strategy is geared around mobility and for people to move around Sydney’s three ‘cities’ – the 30 minute city concept focussing on multi-modal transport.

There is significant industry activity in planning, building and delivering on-demand intelligent public transport. Industry sees that future. The general public is in the here and now. We need to bridge that gap through education, creating infrastructure geared towards the public and integrated transport and physically bringing these multi-modal choices into people’s daily reality.

Transport for NSW’s future strategy is geared around mobility and for people to move around Sydney’s three ‘cities’ – the 30 minute city concept focussing on multi-modal transport.

Customer centric design

How do we navigate through the mobility jungle? It starts and ends with people. By accelerating the fusion of people focused design and new technology, we have an unprecedented opportunity to improve quality of life.

Understanding what people need and why will enable us to plan our cities better. The survey shows convenience, liveability and integration of services are all very important to people. Historically transport and freight planning has been done in isolation, but new insights reaffirm the case for future planning to not be siloed and to focus on multi-modal transport / MaaS.

The people centric trend of precinct-based city design is key in navigating towards a MaaS culture. In 2035, the need to live in the suburbs and work in the CBD may not be as common as it is today.

Live and work in the suburbs
  • 43% of respondents see themselves living and working in the suburbs
Live and work in the city
  • 30% living in the suburbs and working in the CBD
  • 15% live in the inner city and work in the CBD
Live in a regional town and work in the city
  • 12% live in a regional town and work in a capital city

New technologies are driving a real shift in thinking when it comes to city design – with on-demand vehicles and other new services, our travel options increase and we have more choice around where we work.

All these elements feed into providing convenience, impact how we will move around and are significantly changing the nature and dynamic of cities.

People want more time back for themselves. The more we can integrate MaaS transport into our lives, the more time we can give back to people. That’s the future we should be planning for.


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CONTACT US FOR MORE INFORMATION

Russ Yell, Aurecon

Russ Yell

Acting Global Service Leader, UMIT 
& Smart Mobility Leader
+61 402 092808

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